How Long?

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How Long?

Postby OliverEducation » Wed Jun 25, 2008 6:53 am

Does anyone know, on average, how long it would take one man to plow 40 acres with a single horse-drawn plow? I realize there are many variables that would affect the amount of time, but I'm just asking generally how long it would take.

Thanks in advance.
Travis
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Postby Former admin Chris L » Wed Jun 25, 2008 11:01 am

I did a little googling, and found this article in USA Today.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/200 ... rses_x.htm

The gentleman they interviewed says about 1 1/2 acres a day with a 2 horse team. Doing the math, that comes out to just shy of 27 days to plow 40 acres.

I hope the day doesn't come when I can't use my Oliver to pull a plow.
Last edited by Former admin Chris L on Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby OliverEducation » Wed Jun 25, 2008 1:11 pm

Thanks Chris!
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Postby SPeterson » Wed Jun 25, 2008 9:38 pm

There is a good reason my Grandpa was happy to be able buy a tractor. Even after he had the tractors he still used his horses for skidding logs. The Cletrac worked better for logging in the hills though. The good old days weren't too easy on man nor beast.
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Re:

Postby Andy » Tue Aug 05, 2008 10:43 am

According to what I have been told, and my experience in my youth, you can figure one acre per 8 hour day with one team. Wealthy farmers had more than one team, and could plow with one, while the other rested, then switch back to the first team, to get more plowing done. Farmers that really did well financially could buy a sulky plow, and it wouldn't be so tiring on the farmer, they could also afford more horses for the hitch. We used mostly hillside walking plows, out at my Great Grandfathers farm, he had one team, we would talk to the neighbor,'across the fence' while the horses rested. It is important to rest horses, to make sure they get water, and extra feed when they work hard. You can get more work out of mules, but they know when their day is done, and will go to the barn, with or without the plow.
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Plowing with horses.

Postby John Schwiebert » Tue Aug 05, 2008 8:02 pm

Two comments: One time when my tractor trouble shooting was comming back from the state contest there was an Amish farmer plowing. The boys wanted to talk to him. This is early spring and he said by the time he did his everyday chores his goal was to plow at least one acre per day. Now this is for Chris. Brady's over in Paulding county Ohio which has some very heavy soil farmed 5000 acres all with horses. As you may know they were there own Oliver dealer and had Soth Bend built Row Crop #6. He said at one time they farmed with 12 standard Row Crop Tractors. They would hire all the kids in town and work 2 shifts. First shift was daylight till noon. Second shift was noon to dark. I should have kept some notes. The had one old rowcrop there at that time yet and most of the lugs were so thin they had holes worn in the lucgs.
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Postby edchainsaw » Tue Aug 05, 2008 11:03 pm

we have a field my grampa farmed with horse-- it is 3/4 mile long in spots.

he and one of his brothers farmed it for his grandfather. The 2 of them each had a team and a walking plow. they each started their own lands to work but he always said that at then end of the day he could jump across his land and Uncle Arnold could his too. Grampa was a good jumper. If you did some math you could figure it out... I dont want to.. LOL! story sounds better that way.
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