hay-making pictures

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hay-making pictures

Postby calvin innes » Sat Mar 24, 2007 5:58 pm

Larry Coltrin,
Nice pictures on the photo barn site! How does one get to hay flat land? I think back on cutting hay... it all seems pleasant now, but I can remember breakdowns, storm clouds on the horizion,hot humid weather, bales breaking unexpectedly.... yep, I did enjoy it tho'. :wink:
It sure is good to see all the young folks out helping you and enjoying the haying! They get to drive the tractor... no wonder they want to help!
How is that Orchard tractor coming along?
Cal
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Postby 39LC » Sat Mar 24, 2007 11:22 pm

Hi Cal,
Thanx, that is exactly what I was trying to do, is convey that emotion. Sometimes(more often than not) things don't go just right, but as a kid, I remember all the good times. Even stacking in the barn was fun when your friends were there; you'd get so carried away that you would fall behind and get a butt chewing, but still be giggling!
The pictures with the kids is last summer, the ones with the baler and accumulator hooked up are from 2005 when we first got the accumulator.
What a backsaver that is!
Everything here is flat! My Wisconsin friends call me a flatlander! :)

Larry
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Postby carrothead » Sun Apr 27, 2008 10:36 pm

nothing wrong with being a flatlander.remember haying when i was a kid. started working at an early age. 7 tears old and raking hay. those pictures bring back some good memories. thank you
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Postby calvin innes » Mon Apr 28, 2008 8:41 am

Haying sure would have been more fun if it didn't fall at the hottest darn time of year!
I was fortunate, I had no haying equipment but a neighbor who did let me use hers in exchange for looking after the equipment and plowing for her in the spring (I had that equipment...she did not), she also gave me the hay lots. She also operated a cider mill where I worked part time in the fall. Another neighbor would bale for me (no charge)as long as I provided the twine. Afterward the whole family would go up to his place to help him pick up hay as he was an older retired fellow with none to help him except his wife. Haying never cost much except time. (gas was 27 cents a gallon)
Putting hay in the barn was a slower process as we never had an elevator so it was all pitched by hand. For a couple of years my sister was going out with a guy.... he stood on the ground and pitched the bales into the loft...no effort! :shock: yikes! .........sure was good to have him help! out.
I never thought of it as a good job or a bad job....it was just what we did....but I think I'm glad I no longer have to do it as we did then!
Cal
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Postby oliver950 » Mon Apr 28, 2008 7:27 pm

Nice to see the old ollies at work!
Gordon
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Postby 39LC » Tue Apr 29, 2008 11:05 pm

The one thing I DON'T miss is the hornets in the hayloft. Didn't bother too much 'til you got closer to the rafters. Nothing like getting stung on the bare sweaty back would make you come flying off the pile swinging at the air!
I don't have a "hayloft" now, just stack bales under barn overhang with the grapple. Man o man I LOVE that thing! :D Larry
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Postby 39LC » Tue Apr 29, 2008 11:21 pm

The last couple years I up graded to an Oliver 720 baler, stuck a tank and pump for SiloGard on it too. I've always used the two 770's to bale, rake and ted with, but this winter I found a 1655 (kind of tired) that I'm going to try on the baler.

I've been told that I'll like it a lot more than the 770. Probably wont shake the tractor as much as it does the 770 too, but I have to say the 770's did a pretty good job. :) Life is good!!
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Postby calvin innes » Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:38 am

Hi Larry,
I just aquired a 770 diesel....The tractor from he!! It's already nearly killed me. I nearly went over the side of the trailer while unloading it. I guess it would have upset except that the rear hitch caught on the trailer deck. She won't start without a sniff of ether,(likes her alcohol :wink: ) but does not smoke....except out the valve cover breather....go figure. I figure she must be from a conservative republican farm...she has a hard time going left, but she sure turns right easy! :lol: (power steering)
Hey, what sort of little birds do yoou have out there that build nests way up inside of things? The 1850 had a nest tucked way up inside of the dash, between the battery and the fuel tank. I've never seen such a thing here. I don't think it was sparrows.
Wish we had a place to store bales on the fist floor... sure would have made life easy!
Cal
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Postby 39LC » Wed Apr 30, 2008 4:42 pm

Hi Cal,
Glad You are not dead! :shock:

I had an 880 diesel back in the early 70's. That thing would start every time if the a. m. temp. was 62 degrees or higher! If it was 61 degrees, you could crank 'til the battery was dead without so much as a smokey "poop"! I always kept a can of either in the toolbox.

The birds nest had to be sparrows. With the horses (grain) I've got a thousand of those drated pests here! They get into everything.

On Your power steering; I had the same problem and removed mine from the 770 and sent it to a fella at Maibach Tractor. He completly rebuilt and resealed it for I believe a little less than $400.00 I thought it was a bargin! :D Larry
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Postby calvin innes » Wed Apr 30, 2008 6:46 pm

Sparrows huh??? Could be, but the nest was made of really coarse grasses(you growing alfalfa?) At any rate it sure had me baffled because it was tucked so far up inside.
Oh yeah, the power steering! :cry: It would make ya cry too! It's a typical old New England yankee repair job... it looks like a chevy pump and its coming right up through the hood! Actually the tin was cut out to accomodate the pump. The original pump??? Who knows where that went!
We are in the midst of moving to Maine so I will have to content myself with just thinking of repairs to be done. Maybe by late summer I will have a chance to take a more serious look at the dang thing!
Cal
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Postby 39LC » Fri May 02, 2008 10:08 pm

Yep, I grow alfalfa with timothy thrown in there too.
Man, I feel for you doing that move. I bought my place when I was just 20. My Dad co-signed for us. I'm 66 now and the thought of moving scares me to death! I've added on to the add-ons, and filled every nook and cranny with my STUFF!
The village is kind of on my case to sell to them.......I might if they let me stay until the end (for me that is). If I go out of here feet first, it will be up to my kids to sort all this VALUABLE STUFF out!
So I really hope that You get all Your STUFF moved safely and in good order Cal. Wish I wasn't a thousand miles away or I could come out and lend a hand.
Good luck and Gods speed my friend,
Larry :D
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Postby 39LC » Fri May 02, 2008 10:09 pm

Yep, I grow alfalfa with timothy thrown in there too.
Man, I feel for you doing that move. I bought my place when I was just 20. My Dad co-signed for us. I'm 66 now and the thought of moving scares me to death! I've added on to the add-ons, and filled every nook and cranny with my STUFF!
The village is kind of on my case to sell to them.......I might if they let me stay until the end (for me that is). If I go out of here feet first, it will be up to my kids to sort all this VALUABLE STUFF out!
So I really hope that You get all Your STUFF moved safely and in good order Cal. Wish I wasn't a thousand miles away or I could come out and lend a hand.
Good luck and Gods speed my friend,
Larry :D
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Postby calvin innes » Wed May 07, 2008 7:02 am

Got in last night from Maine and will turn around and make another trip tomorrow morning....6 hours one way. I have most of the smaller, easy "stuff" from the shop and implements moved but still have 6 tractors yet to move. The 1850 and the 2655 being among those yet to move. I don't have the engine reassembled and back in the 2655 yet so it would be nearly impossible to move at this point! :cry: .....hope all this is done before snow flies!!!! :lol:
Cal
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